Short-term boredom for long-term results
1st June 2009 By: 14996

The concept of consistency is often seen as boring. Whereas flamboyancy or flippancy are often seen as interesting and exciting. As a result, the emotional roller coaster becomes the path most travelled rather than the step-by-step approach of becoming a consistent player.

The psychology of golf is generally understood and appreciated at a professional tour level. However, it seems that it is the appreciation of consistency that still escapes many players.

The concept of consistency is often seen as boring. Whereas flamboyancy or flippancy are often seen as interesting and exciting. As a result, the emotional roller coaster becomes the path most travelled rather than the step-by-step approach of becoming a consistent player.

Consistency may be boring, particularly if you believe that variety is in fact the spice of life. However, when it comes to your game, consistency does bring you the excitement in terms of results and a professional career that allows you to realize your potential. In addition, being consistent saves you the energy usually expended whilst riding an emotional roller coaster.

A methodical approach to identifying strengths and weaknesses, and planning how to build and refine your game over time, will result in productive use of your emotional energy.

Consistency is about doing the same things that work for you all of the time. It requires dedication and discipline. These things are unique to you and involve all areas of your game associated with your technical, physical, tactical, and psychological skills.

Working out what works for you is imperative so that once you have that you aim to repeat it, making it an integral part of your game. Repetition creates automaticity and competition requires this to maximize your transfer of practice.

Yes, you will change and fine-tune aspects of your game along the way, however consistency does not mean changing things all of the time. It is developing a strong understanding of what you need as a player to give you self-confidence to perform.

It is a common observation that successful people do the things that most people cannot be bothered to do – they are willing to dedicate themselves to consistency to get the results they desire.

 

What does this mean for you as a player?

Be clear on what works for you in each area of your game. Pick the key points that form a part of your game when you are playing at or close to your best. This process will involve self-reflection as well as discussions with individuals in your support network. Review these key points regularly to ensure that you continue to reinforce the things that work.

Resist the temptation to frequently change aspects of your game but commit to becoming a consistent player at practice and competition.

Essentially, you are aiming to understand yourself and your game so that you have a very clear concrete set of actions and thoughts that guide you to optimizing your practice and competitive pursuits.

Article from Ladies European Tour:
http://www.ladieseuropeantour.com/?id=21039&pid=1010
Published: 1/06/2009

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